Are Eggs Good For Dogs? Can Dogs Eat Scrambled Eggs?

Post Image

I gave up eggs a few years ago. They just didn’t seem to meet my own personal needs. In fact, research shows that eggs are “associated with adverse factors in human health, mainly due to their cholesterol content”. But just because I decided to stop eating them, it didn’t mean for a second that I would make my dog give them up as well. Think about it. Dogs and cats have been observed countless times, eating right out of birds’ nests with no problem.

There is such an idea as getting too much of a good thing, you know. Moderation is key. That means that whatever you feed your doggy, from raw food to processed snacks, needs to be portioned out properly. Just as I do this with dog shampoo, I also do this with dog food. The key is the right ingredients in the right amounts. 

Are Raw Eggs Good For Dogs To Eat?

Cracked eggs in grass.

Raw Eggs Are Delicious for Dogs

Overall, eggs are good nutrient sources for animals. As per a 2019 study, “the relative amount of unsaturated (monounsaturated + polyunsaturated) to saturated fatty acids in yolk is particularly high compared to other animal-derived food sources”. The same study also highlights that certain nutrients in eggs can even “significantly protect animals from colitis and reduce the local expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines”.

While technically your dog can eat raw eggs, it’s not the ideal form to consume them. There are risks including salmonella involved, and just to be on the safe side, you’re better off cooking the egg for your pup. If you’re not sure, double-check with your puppy doctor!

Are Hard Boiled Eggs Good For Dogs?

The short answer is yes, they are good for them. Dogs can eat hard-boiled eggs with no problem. As mentioned, there is a chance that some of the amounts of nutrients could be diminished as a result of the boiling process. But, a clear advantage of that method is that it is the easiest way to provide your doggy with eggs.

Are Scrambled Eggs Good For Dogs?

Scrambled eggs are also a fine food for dogs, but you need to watch what you put in them. Here, the scrambled eggs need to be clean and free of any additives. No oils, no garlic, no onions, no avocado, no salt, pepper, or other spices. Perhaps a bit of cheese (since we know how much dogs love cheese), and that is it. Serve it plain and simple, and your dog will be good to go. Once again, start with small portions and see if your doggy’s stomach can handle it. Some are more sensitive than others, just like us humans.

Top 3 Health Benefits Of Eggs For Dogs

Puppy sitting in field of grass.

Eggs are Full of Nutrients for a Healthy Pup

However you decide to serve them, eggs can do your doggy a lot of good. They provide him (or her) with a healthy dose of nutrients. Commercial dog food doesn’t always have it all, in spite of what it may say on the bag. This is due to the fact that not all dogs are alike. If you feel your dog could use a bit more of a protein punch, eggs may be just the thing.  The top 3 health benefits of eggs for dogs are:

  1. Plenty of protein. Eggs are full of animal protein, and this is primarily what a dog’s meal should consist of. It helps to build up the body, from the inside out.
  2. Vitamin B7 (aka biotin). The yolks of the eggs have a variety of nutrients, and biotin is one of them. It aids in the development of a healthy coat. As for the biotin deficiency issue – it would take a large amount of egg whites to cause a deficiency in B7. Unless you know your dog is already suffering from such a deficiency, eggs will be no problem.
  3. Vitamin D. This is another vitamin which is found in abundance in this particular food. It works together with the protein inside of the egg, to improve your doggy’s teeth and bones.

Depending on the dog’s current diet, eggs could be a real treat. Whether it is raw, hard boiled, scrambled, or even soft boiled, an egg can be the perfect addition to your dog’s bowl.

Does Your Dog Need Titer Testing?

Conclusion

Eggs as dog food enhancers is still something of a controversy. Some say eggs are fine and shells are not. Some say raw is fine, but cooked is not. Yolks, not whites. And so on.

Ultimately, it’s important to check with your vet and see what they think is best for your dog. Eggs are generally safe and healthy for most dogs, so don’t be afraid of feeding them to your animal buddy.

If you feel your dog might be allergic or otherwise sensitive to eggs, the best thing to do would be to discontinue serving them, to consult with your vet, and maybe find a suitable replacement.